Cook  Discover  Eat  Trending   ·   08 Oct   ·   05:10 PM   ·   2 minutes Read

Will Singaporeans Queue For Japan's Miracle Pancakes?

  

A new Japanese restaurant is coming to Singapore. But unlike most Japanese eateries, it specialises in pancakes. To be specific, Flipper specialises in impossibly fluffy soufflé Kiseki (or miracle) pancakes that melt in your mouth. They also serve fries, sandwiches and bubble tea.

Flipper’s first outlet in Singapore is set to open in November this year, in the heart of Orchard Road, in Takashimaya mall.

Flipper currently has 12 outlets in Japan. They have also expanded to Taiwan and Hong Kong. Last year, they opened their only outlet in the United States so far, in New York. And the hype was huge. Part of it, I suspect, were the queues. Many Americans reported having to wait from 20 minutes to a whole hour before they could set eyes on their food. Waiting was a guaranteed affair if you wanted Flipper pancakes, even if the restaurant was half empty.

While I’m not sure if that concept would work here, I’m sure Flipper will garner its share of fans who will spread the word about its food. Flipper’s intriguing menu, which includes both savoury and sweet options will likely draw in some curious souls, who might become Flipper converts. A peek at Flipper’s menu reveals items like Soufflé Pancakes with Fresh Fruit, Waffles with Chicken and Lemon Ricotta Pancake With Meringue.

The bubble tea gang can meet up at Flipper for bobba and gossip.

Trendsetters can bring their friends to the latest food to be seen and ‘grammed.

Self-professed foodies can revel in show their pals exactly how to eat the pancakes as well as explain how Flipper does their pancakes.

According to Insider, a New York publication, the waiting time for Flipper’s famous pancakes is not without reason. The pancake has to be monitored carefully as it is cooked from side to side and given time to rise. The pancake batter is also poured into a circular mold for that perfectly round shape.

Have you tried other Japanese soufflé pancakes in Singapore, like that of Gram Pancakes and Café? Did you know they also employ a similar concept of slow-cooking their pancakes to fluffy perfection? How long is too long when it comes to waiting to try new food?